Steuart's Brigade (VA)

9th, 14th, 38th, 53rd, & 57th Virginia Infantry Regiments


Originally Armistead's Brigade, Brigadier General George "Maryland" Steuart took command in the summer of 1864, replacing Brigadier General Seth Barton.  It's inspector was Capt. J.D. Darden.


Strength

Aug ’64

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan ’65

Feb

Present & Absent

     3244

         --

         --

     3503

     3475

     3285

         --

Present

     1593

         --

         --

     2237

     2405

     2409

         --

Effective for Field

     1345

         --

         --

     1967

     1840

     1828

         --




Arms:  .58 caliber. No more detailed information given.



Accoutrements: In August, 53rd and 57th Va show about 1/3 of men lacking bayonets with the other regiments closer to fully

                  equipped, and a few dozen men in each regiment in brigade wearing cartridge box on waist belt.



Condition of clothing:  "Good" in August, then "bad" in Nov.-Dec. (but see inspector notes for 5 Dec.).  Improves to

                 "poor" in January.




Military appearance:  "Fair" in December, all other months "good".



Personal cleanliness:  All regiments "neat" or "generally neat" on all reports.



General sanitary condition: "Good" in August, "fair" in November, "food" again in December and January.



Discipline:  "Good" on all reports.



Drill:  All regiments drill "well" for all reports.


Police of camp or post:  "Thorough" on all reports.




Inspector's Comments



10 August:



The health of the troops has been impaired since they have been on this line. The camp is dry, well supplied with good water, and thoroughly policed. The rations are good and the men have been constantly employed in strengthening the works. The command is well clad and well shod.



[]Note from Division Inspector


There has been no Brigadier General commanding this brigade since Brigadier General S.S. Barton was relieved May 1864, and the want is seriously felt. A Colonel commanding acts under many disadvantages no matter what his qualifications, and the discipline and condition of this brigade has been materially impaired since it has been without a Brigadier General.




5 December:


Clothing is greatly needed, especially blankets, many men having none and no overcoat either. Overcoats greatly needed. Many trousers and jackets so ragged the men suffer as they have few and indifferent shirts. Condition of shoes pretty good. A shoe shop has been established within the past few days. A tailor shop for repairs soon will be.



[]Note from Division Inspector Walter Harrison


This brigade report only received this morning owing to the fact that the brigade has been constantly under fire for more than a week past as explained in note from Brig. General Steuart. The troops were fired into while under inspection on Friday, Saturday and Sunday last. I have only one exception to take to this report. I do not think the clothing can be considered absolutely "bad" in comparison with other commands. Critically, no command is "good".



[Note from ANV Inspector General Peyton, 27 December]


Pickett's Division has been within the last few days amply supplied with blankets and shoes. Pants and jackets however are greatly needed, as well as throughout the army.




28 December:


Jackets, pantaloons, overcoats, shirts, drawers, stockings, and also caps and a few blankets are greatly needed.




28 January:


1. Clothing: The articles furnished would have afforded more relief if issued differently. Supplies come to us in driblets, and no effort of an active, energetic quartermaster has produced any improvement in the amount of issues. Needed now 1072 overcoats, 251 blankets, 264 pairs shoes, 635 pairs pants, 411 jackets, 251 caps, 661 shirts, 817 pairs drawers, 295 pairs socks. No overcoats issued this winter.


2. Forage: There has been issued during January an average of 8 pounds of corn and 4 pounds of long forage, supplies brought in mostly by wagons. Only a small amount procured by way of railroad.


3. Transportation: Condition only moderate. Needed one wagon, team and harness for ordnance transportation and three mules to supply losses from regular baggage transportation. The inspectors of transportation continue to report no draft animals to be had. No good harness oil can be procured from the officers whose duty is to supply it. The order to supply the places of the able-bodied teamsters with disabled men has been rigidly enforced, and transportation has suffered much in consequence.





Source: Records of the Adjutant & Inspector General’s Department, NARA, microcopy M935


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All original content copyright James M. Schruefer, 2011-2014.